April 16th, 2014
fashionsfromhistory:

Costume for Margot Fonteyn as Odelie in “Swan Lake”
Nicholas Georgiadis
1964

Nicholas Georgiadis designed this superb black and silver tutu worn by Margot Fonteyn as Odile in Act III of Swan Lake in Vienna in 1964. She and Rudolf Nureyev were a huge success in the ballet, receiving 49 curtain calls on the first night. Although a highly conventional style, the tutu does, in fact, subtly change over the years. In the 1950s, most tutu skirts were flat and rigid, and are often referred to as ‘plate’ tutus. This tutu is an example of the style of the 1960s and early 1970s, when the skirts softened into a gentle droop. The softer line suited Fonteyn at that late stage of her career, as did the bodice decoration, which subtly breaks up the surface without becoming fussy, with the main decoration concentrated at centre front. The skill in designing tutu bodices, which Georgiadis understood well, is to use decoration that will be practical for partnering; too many jewels or encrustations can cut a partner’s hands. Odile, the swan princess, has been dressed in white since Swan Lake was created in 1890, but the convention of dressing the evil Odile in black is a later development - Alicia Markova wore red when she danced Odile for the Vic-Wells (now Royal) Ballet in 1934. Black is now so widely accepted, that for over fifty years the Act III pas de deux has been called the Black Swan pas de deux.

V&A

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume for Margot Fonteyn as Odelie in “Swan Lake”

Nicholas Georgiadis

1964

Nicholas Georgiadis designed this superb black and silver tutu worn by Margot Fonteyn as Odile in Act III of Swan Lake in Vienna in 1964. She and Rudolf Nureyev were a huge success in the ballet, receiving 49 curtain calls on the first night. Although a highly conventional style, the tutu does, in fact, subtly change over the years. In the 1950s, most tutu skirts were flat and rigid, and are often referred to as ‘plate’ tutus. This tutu is an example of the style of the 1960s and early 1970s, when the skirts softened into a gentle droop. The softer line suited Fonteyn at that late stage of her career, as did the bodice decoration, which subtly breaks up the surface without becoming fussy, with the main decoration concentrated at centre front. The skill in designing tutu bodices, which Georgiadis understood well, is to use decoration that will be practical for partnering; too many jewels or encrustations can cut a partner’s hands. Odile, the swan princess, has been dressed in white since Swan Lake was created in 1890, but the convention of dressing the evil Odile in black is a later development - Alicia Markova wore red when she danced Odile for the Vic-Wells (now Royal) Ballet in 1934. Black is now so widely accepted, that for over fifty years the Act III pas de deux has been called the Black Swan pas de deux.

V&A

fluroescent:

nuclearharvest:

Dad and Son Addicted to Heroin photographed by Anatoly Rakhimbaev

This is cruel

fluroescent:

nuclearharvest:

Dad and Son Addicted to Heroin photographed by Anatoly Rakhimbaev

This is cruel

(via youwillunderstand)

(Source: zefron, via andylegit)

quickweaves:

quickweaves:

White people destroyed 3/4s of the world for spices and have the nerve not to season their food.

this post wont die 

(via asdfghjklesley)

If kids can’t socialize, who should parents blame? Simple: They should blame themselves. This is the argument advanced in It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens, by Microsoft researcher Danah Boyd. Boyd—full disclosure, a friend of mine—has spent a decade interviewing hundreds of teens about their online lives.

What she has found, over and over, is that teenagers would love to socialize face-to-face with their friends. But adult society won’t let them. “Teens aren’t addicted to social media. They’re addicted to each other,” Boyd says. “They’re not allowed to hang out the way you and I did, so they’ve moved it online.”

It’s true. As a teenager in the early ’80s I could roam pretty widely with my friends, as long as we were back by dark. But over the next three decades, the media began delivering a metronomic diet of horrifying but rare child-abduction stories, and parents shortened the leash on their kids. Politicians warned of incipient waves of youth wilding and superpredators (neither of which emerged). Municipalities crafted anti-loitering laws and curfews to keep young people from congregating alone. New neighborhoods had fewer public spaces. Crime rates plummeted, but moral panic soared. Meanwhile, increased competition to get into college meant well-off parents began heavily scheduling their kids’ after-school lives.

The result, Boyd discovered, is that today’s teens have neither the time nor the freedom to hang out. So their avid migration to social media is a rational response to a crazy situation. They’d rather socialize F2F, so long as it’s unstructured and away from grown-ups. “I don’t care where,” one told Boyd wistfully, “just not home.

'Isn't a kind of a trip to know you have your own action figure?' 'It’s pretty dope.’ (c)

(Source: porthoses, via magdalenarivera)